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KaBlam Manga Digest Specs by LOOMcomics KaBlam Manga Digest Specs by LOOMcomics
:star: Hit the "Download" button to the rightto obtain the .PSD Template File.

:bulletred: Resource Type: Manga template


:bulletred: Paper Size: Ka-Blam Digital Printing Custom Specs


:bulletred: Resolution: 300 DPI


:bulletred: File Size: 2 MB


:bulletred: Specifications: This is available at their fantastic website as well. Just trying to have it up on DeviantArt as well for those who need it.

-Full Bleed Size:
5.5 in x 7.75 in

Trimmed Size:
5 in x 7.5 in

Safe Zone:
4.5 in x 6.25 in


:bulletred: Personal Notes:
Since they gave their own template, didn't feel like copying it exactly. You can find their .PSD for download here!


:bulletred: Use: You may use these to overlay them over a digital file if you'd like. I usually just use them to check myself. I overlay it and the lessen the opacity of the template to see where everything lies with respect to printing.


:bulletred: General Regions:

Line frames, known as borders, tell you how much of the paper space you can use for your manga images. Artists rely on these boundary lines to contain their drawings and avoid having their work cropped out when itís published. Both American comic book artist and Japanese manga artists incorporate their own standard measurement sizes. You need to be aware of several border measurements, and you should indicate them on your paper even before you pick up your pencil to draw. --Manga for Dummies by Kensuke Okabayashi

:star: Bleed: The outer edges. They're necessary to protect you against printing errors. The full bleed size is generally what you are going to turn in to your publisher or company for printing, whether you're doing business cards, brochures, magazines, or comics. It's the total size of your document.


:star: Trimmed Size: The relative size of the final product. The trim size denotes the size of the product after it has undergone print processing (trimming). It roughly corresponds to what your comic page will look like in print. (There is some margin for printing error though, which is why the bleed exists to protect you.)


:star: Safe Area: This is the bull's eye zone. It's super safe. It's where you keep the most important content, like important texts and dialogue. It's like an inner protective shell protecting the readable content from being accidentally cropped off during printing. NOTE: You can draw outside of this area; it's utilized mostly for keeping speech towards the middle of the page.


:bulletred: Other Templates:

- B4 Manga Template 600 DPI
- B4 Manga Template 300 DPI
- A4 Manga Template 600 DPI
- A4 Manga Template 300 DPI
- Yen Press Talent Search Template 600 DPI
- Yen Press Talent Search Template 300 DPI
- Ka-Blam Manga Specs


:star: Quickly Done, so please point out mistakes so I may fix them. Again, purposely left the Ruler / Paper Size Region in for overall clarity, but you may trim it off if you so desire.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconfaithwalkers:
FaithWalkers Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2013  Professional General Artist
Hm..Question. I've used one of your manga templates before. I sized one of my mangas, 600 x 900 with 250 dpi
Seeing how it's so small, would stretching it do this format hurt it's printing quality?
Thanks in advance. :)
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
Whenever you blow up an image, you degrade the quality. There are some methods for blowing up images if you do a Google search (assuming you have Photoshop or some equivalent), and even some Photoshop plugins ([link]).

Honestly, that pixel data seems a little small, even though you've set it to for 250 ppi. Pixels are really just data, so when you set your image size, make sure you check your cm/inches dimensions also. Just for reference, 600 x 900 pixels is my output size at 72 dpi (web display). It shouldn't be your pixel size at 250 ppi.

For a digest-sized manga (comic) page...

Your pixel data should be closer to: 1375 x 1938 @ 250 ppi.

Around 1650 x 2325 pixels @ 300 ppi.

Your image at your current size is only: 2.4 x 3.6 inches in size! You can blow it up, but if you have tones, they're definitely going to look odd, and lines may fuzz out a little. If your image is just lineart, you can employ some sharpening techniques to minimize the blur and pixelation, though.
Reply
:iconfaithwalkers:
FaithWalkers Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2013  Professional General Artist
Ohhh, I got it. ;w; It seems when I blew it up though, the lines did get choppy.
But when I stretched it without the program, it printed just fine. Weird. Haha.
I marked down the sizes though! Thank you for the help. :)
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
Oh? Interesting! In any case, I'm glad you found something that worked! Figuring out what sizes you wanna work with can really be such a pain! :heart:
Reply
:iconfaithwalkers:
FaithWalkers Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Professional General Artist
It really is. It made me super worried when I saw how small it was. T___T
I'm so relieved it prints out fine.
Haha, thanks for the help again though.
Reply
:iconmino-detechun:
Mino-Detechun Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Can this be applied to B4 paper?
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
you can technically apply it to any paper. just need to convert it and make sure height and width aspect ratios stay the same.

You could scale this to 9 x 12.5 and it'd work on b4-sized paper. I'm not quite sure what you're asking. b4 really is just paper. You can measure out whatever specs you'd like on it. It just depends what you're going for.

If you're wanting traditional b4 sized safe areas and trims, a link to that is in the author's comment.
Reply
:iconmino-detechun:
Mino-Detechun Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Do you know the conversion of A4 paper? Sorry if you don't then thats ok too.
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Well, I mean, it depends on what you want. Whatever size you're using, as long as you keep it in aspect ratio (the aspect ratio of an image describes the proportional relationship between its width and its height.), you're fine. I have a template for A4 dimensions in the notes you can download, BUT if you're wanting to put Kablam specs ONTO A4 paper, then it's just a matter of aspect ratio. Keep the relationship of the height-to-width the same, and you can use what you'd like.

A4 paper is something like 210mm by 297mm....

OR

8.267" x 11.693"

If you use 8.250" x 11.625" as your starting point, you can put the Kablam specs on it at 8.25 x 11.625 total document bleed an all. Proportionally speaking.
Reply
:iconangelerenoir:
AngelERenoir Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Student Digital Artist
What if I have page spreads? How do I do work with that?
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
This is a great question, and quite tricky, too, if you've never done it before. A page spread is basically two of these babies minus the inner "facing" bleeds.

I could show you how to traditionally do it and digitally prep in the future, probably better with visuals or video. Do you mind if I add this question to marketing research I'm collecting for my site? ([link])
Reply
:iconangelerenoir:
AngelERenoir Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I saw the traditional tutorial thingy you posted, so I'm now wondering how to set up the file when I want to send it in to Ka-Blam to print.

Sure, add in the question.
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
1. Firstly, Kablam has a dodgy track record with actually adhering to their bleeds. I find that, at least 20% of the time in the orders I orders, they not only missed their trim, but missed their specified BLEEDs, which isn't good for a printing company providing their own bleed specs.

2. Setting up the file. First, in order to answer you question as clearly as I can, how are you working? Are you (a) measuring it all out and drawing your work traditionally and scanning it in? or (b) drawing digitally on a layer above your specs?
Reply
:iconangelerenoir:
AngelERenoir Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Student Digital Artist
1)Yikes! That's horrible. Then where would you suggest getting my stuff printed?

2) Oh, draw digitally on layers in the PSD itself
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
1) I'm not quite sure yet. I haven't tested out enough places. I will try to get a review up soon!

2) Since you use photoshop, maybe make you might benefit from making your own "continuous" two-page spread document. Before we speak, I'm assuming you know what the bleed, trim, and safe area regions are. If not, you'll need to review them before trying to wrap your brain around this. A continuous 2-pg spread is different from having 2 pages displayed "2-up."

2-up: 2 pages side by side at the same time, but not continuous with one another.

Continuous spread: 2 pages that are continuous with one another; images flow fluidly across the pages. If you are a digital user, you simply continue drawing across the middle and treat the space as one huge blank piece of paper.

-------------------------------------------

Step 1. A continous 2 pg spread ignores the inside bleeds. Know your boundaries and specs for 2 pages. For Kablam, just multiply the width by 2. Two 5.5" by 7.75" pages equals a total width of 11" x 7.75."

Step 2. Cut off the inner bleed from two opposing templates and stick them together to get your continuous spread template. Your dimensions have subtracted the 2 inner bleeds.

Since each bleed is 0.25", subtracting 2 of them is -.50" bringing you new document size to 10.5" x 7.75."

(HINT: It will look just like this, [link] although the user has mislabeled her trim LINE as trim AREA. Her measurements are right, even if her labels could be a bit better.)

The point is to understand how we actually get the measurements so you can alter and outfit any page-with-a-bleed for continuous spreads. :D

Step 3. Draw across them. Treat it like a big drawing page.

Step 4. Save your file as Pages 1-2_Master Copy.

---NOW THAT YOU'VE SAVED YOUR WORK, SEPARATE THEM FROM EACH OTHER----

Step 5. Crop the left page ((5x5" x 7.75")) from 1-2_Master Copy and Save as... Page 1.

Step 6. Crop the right page ((5x5" x 7.75")) from 1-2 Master Copy and and Save as... Page 2.

NOTE: Now you have 2 continuous pages. Unlike traditionally, digitally we have no blank space because Pages 1 & 2 share the same inner space/drawing info due to the magic of reproducible digital information.
Reply
:iconjohandarkweb:
johandarkweb Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
jeje Easy and Practic. Good ^^
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
^_^
Reply
:iconancestorjade:
Ancestorjade Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2012   Traditional Artist
What is this to be used for? Is it so you can resize your manga pages and fit into book?
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Yes. :)
Reply
:iconkuraidraws:
KuraiDraws Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2011
I think they may have changed their specs since 2010, is this still accurate? =)
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2011  Professional Interface Designer
Looks like it. See their manga digest specs here: [link]
Reply
:iconditzyizzy:
DitzyIzzy Featured By Owner May 8, 2011  Student General Artist
so if i want to draw my comic traditionally can i just print the template off? or would the size change too much?
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner May 8, 2011  Professional Interface Designer
You can print it off to trace the areas if you'd like. So long as your aspect ratio is locked, the ratio of width to height should correspond. However, it might be easier to cut yourself some templates out of something sturdy to trace. You could always get a ruler and measure it out, too. What size paper are you going to be working on?
Reply
:iconditzyizzy:
DitzyIzzy Featured By Owner May 8, 2011  Student General Artist
the paper in my sketch book is 9X12
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner May 13, 2011  Professional Interface Designer
Hmmm, since you're wanting to use Kablam specs, it might be a good idea to pop them all into a spreadsheet and get the closest specs you can to them. Are you wanting the utilize the entirety of the sheet?

Since 5.5 x 7.75 is the size of the Kablam full document, The closest you could get for using your page in aspect ratio is somewhere in the ballpark 8.53 x 12... you can input the numbers into a spread sheet and then multiply by whichever factor you choose to get numbers, and get some idea of where all your areas are going to lie. I think so long as you get close, once you scan it in, you can always tweak the sizes digitally.

Uhhh. Numbers can be so dizzying. XD Srsly, though, if you need any help, you can always note me and I'll try my best to help sort it out based on what you'd like to try.
Reply
:iconditzyizzy:
DitzyIzzy Featured By Owner May 13, 2011  Student General Artist
Thank you very much :D
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner May 13, 2011  Professional Interface Designer
I hope that helps. I use Excel and spreadsheets anytime I was to "size up" some specs for working. :D
Reply
:iconsentineldci:
SentinelDCI Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2011  Professional General Artist
eben if i am using a 9x12 demsion paper cant i just use the very same 5.5x7.75 demsions the art work or does the paper in its entierty have to have artwork.
Reply
:iconloomcomics:
LOOMcomics Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2011  Professional Interface Designer
You can use what you want. :) I usually multiply by diff factors until I get something close to the the paper size I'm working on. So long as you keep them in aspect ration, you're generally going to be okay.
Reply
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Submitted on
December 1, 2010
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